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Fan Bay Deep Shelter

Submitted by Kent Historic … on 6 October 2014

Fan Bay Deep Shelter Fan Bay Deep Shelter is a system of underground tunnels located on the edge of Fan Hole on the White Cliffs. The shelter is located on the land which was purchased in the national appeal to buy the remaining section of the White Cliffs in 2012. The tunnels are in excellent condition and today remain the biggest and best preserved deep shelter in the Dover area. The underground tunnel system is almost all that remains of the Fan Bay battery.

A Fatal Fire at Milton Regis 1915

Submitted by Kent Historic … on 10 October 2014

A Fire Fatal at Milton Regis by Alan R. Anstee In February 1915 with large numbers of troops billeted in and around Sittingbourne the potential benefits of having troops in the area was demonstrated by the effects of a fire in King Street. The following account is based on reports in the Kent Messenger (KM) of the 6th February 1915 and the East Kent Gazette (EKG) of the same date.

The Sad End of the Sergeant Major's Career

Submitted by Kent Historic … on 10 October 2014

The sad end of the Sergeant Major’s Career by Alan R. Anstee Whilst researching for the Swale 20th Century Defence Project a number of interesting and at times odd events concerning the military were seen in the local newspapers from the early years of WWI when large numbers of troops were based in and around Sittingbourne. Perhaps the oddest of these was first seen in the 23rd January 1915 edition of the Kent Messenger. This reported on the trial of John Murphy, alias Hugh Charles Caston a Royal Engineer Company Sergeant Major.

Newspapers and Service Records as Tools for Researching the WWI Stockbury Valley Defence Line

Submitted by Kent Historic … on 17 July 2015

Report for the KAS AGM by Alan R. Anstee An on going research project The R.E.s have left us a wealth of maps and photos of the fieldworks, so we know that they looked like and where they were. The war diaries gave some information as to which areas units were working in but little more. However there is no real information on the men who built them. Thanks in no small part to the East Kent Gazette we now know, the names of many of the officers and men.